Tag Archives: community spark

How to Listen on the Web

Social media makes everybody …

A NEWS STUDIO – sites like Daily Me allow republishing of personalized news

A MOVIE STUDIO – “You Tube Video Lands $30 Million Movie Deal

A PUBLISHING COMPANY – social publishing


A GOSSIP COLUMN Perez Hilton became one of the most read columnists in Hollywood.


With everyone contributing something on the web, attention becomes our most sought after commodity.  How is anyone supposed to listen with all this chatter?  The way I do it is pretty simple.  Between Google Reader and Alerts, my iPhone, and Twitter I can keep a pretty good tabs on all the things I want to hear.  This is my abbreviated step-by-step guide to filtering out the noise.

Get a Google Reader account.

This will allow you to aggregate subscription content from webistes through RSS feeds usually by clicking the little icon that looks like this:

You will then get updates whenever the site content changes.  The best way to use your RSS Reader is to scan the headlines for anything that looks like something you want to digest.  Star items that you want to come back to or email them to yourself (there are other applications for reading RSS items later, such as Readitlater or Instapaper, but I want everything in one place).  Google Reader keeps starred items in a separate folder for you.  Using this method will allow you to get through your RSS inbox rather quickly, keeping it from piling up.  If you’re anything like me you get about 400 updates per day – reading everything is not an option and stopping to read while you are doing your sorting will only result in more pile up.

Get a Google Alerts account.


RSS subscriptions are great for keeping up with the sites you know about, but what about those sites you don’t know about?  To listen on the web you need to be able to customize what content gets fed to you.  Enter Google Alerts, step 2 of setting up your listening post.  Simply type in the term you want to receive alerts about, change the preferences to receive updates in your Google Reader, and you are done.  Anytime that term or terms hit Google’s index you will be sent an RSS alert.  You can customize alerts for immediate delivery or daily digest.

NOOB quick tip: put terms like “social media” or other multiple word searches in “quotation marks” so that Alerts look for the full term.

Get an iPhone

We are not going into the details of getting an iPhone, but the takeaway here is that having a mobile device to read your feeds makes filtering, maintaining, and digesting the information much easier.  I will check and filter feeds while walking the dog, waiting in line, and sitting on the bus.  The app I use to read my feeds is called MobileRSS, a totally free reader that has a lot of functionality.  My favorite feature is the ability to send feed items to Twitter, Email, or other places with 1-click.  This allows me and my network to follow up on items of interest that I find.  For example, after seeing and scanning Martin Reed’s post Online Community Metrics: numbers you need to pay attention to, I emailed the item to my team from MobileRSS.  While I filtered the rest of my RSS list and then came back to the post to read it in depth, other team members had set up a meeting to discuss metrics in our community, drafted an agenda, and looked forward to discussing the issue.  We recently had a productive meeting and figured out some new strategies based on this golden nugget from my listening post.

A Word About Twitter

Besides Google alerts, I also use Tweetdeck to listen.  Tweetdeck is a 3rd party application that lets you maintain columns which monitor Twitter.  The columns can watch your network’s activity, mentions about you, direct messages, Twitter trends, or any topic you specify in search.  The usefulness here is when I’m working on Twitter related items and don’t want to keep checking my Google Reader.  Since I have Tweetdeck open anyway to send messages for the company, I can simultaneously monitor Twitter for chatter about our company or any subject I am interested in.  We will have to see how Google Real-time Search changes the usefulness of Tweetdeck, but for now I find it to be a good tool in the box.

So there you have it: the ways I listen on the web.  What are your methods?  Do you use any of these tools or something different (ex/ Net Vibes)?  Does your company use a service like Radian6 to professionally monitor?

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    Best Practices: Building Online Communities (intro of sorts)

    Ever since creation man has built communities.  Our first communities were tribal and used for survival, but in today’s wired world the online community is all about finding common interests and opportunities to connect that compell us to spend time sifting through the profiles and prattling of others (call it our “snooping instinct”).  But how do these communities even get started and how can businesses benefit from leveraging the natural instinct of the herd to click together?

     As the Manager of Academic Content Development for LexisNexis I have built mini-communities with my employees and partnership teams on our Share Point, and have partnered with Martindale Hubbell Connected (think “Linkedin for lawyers”) to find ways of integrating content into the growing community there, (I also manage the Nefesh B’Nefesh (aliyah/Israel) group on Linkedin).  The best resource I have found on building communities is a site called “Community Spark,” written by community guru Martin Reed.  Martin’s tips have helped to refocus my approach from one of content dictator to content facilitator.  A primer that I suggest for any community devleloper is 95 things I have learnt in 9 years of community building.  This is a list of short suggestions for building and managing a community.  Here are my favorites from the list:

    23. Don’t be fooled into thinking members will use features even if they requested those features.

    24. Keep features down to a minimum …

    27. Change your community rarely …

    38. You need to highlight the best content and give strong calls to action …

    47. Asking questions is the single most effective way of generating activity in an online community.

    48. You need to share information about yourself …

    64. You need to act as a matchmaker by introducing members to other members …

    71. You need to cater to your members – not your own wants or needs.

    72. Trust is critical.

    73. You need to give out a lot of ego strokes and compliments …

    80. Do not edit or delete negative comments about your brand. Respond to them openly.

    81. The more you moderate or intervene, the less active your community will be.

    82. You need to delegate some tasks to trusted members.

    83. You should give trusted members additional responsibilities and powers …

    88. You can’t be afraid to experiment …

    91. It can be easy to forget that a real person sits behind every member name.

    92. You need to be passionate about your online community.

     

    Group dynamics depend on creating a place where people can shine, bring what they do best to the table, and feel a part of something greater than anyone of the members.   Aliza Sherman of Webworkers Daily said:

    Bottom line: Online community building is about the people first, the shared interests or experiences next, and the tools are the means of bringing people together in new ways.

    What has been your experience with community building?

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