Tag Archives: seth godin

Seth Godin’s Linchpin and Mastering the Art of Social Media Policy

Daniel A. Schwartz, author of the Connecticut Employment Law Blog posted about one of the presentations from Legal Tech back in February 2010.  His post, Social Media Policies and Practices Developing as Companies Begin to Embrace It, gave some details from the panel discussion by the following in-house lawyers: Lesley Rosenthal (Lincoln Center), Ted Banks (former in-house at Kraft), and Mark Bisard (American Express).  Check out Daniels post here.
The panelists basically discussed how social media policy is becoming a more recognized form of policy for a company to have.  Ted Banks spoke up as say that employees can become disheartened and resentful of too restrictive a policy.  I left this comment in response:
I am most in agreement with Ted about social media presenting an opportunity to companies to engage their creative employees and let them flourish.  This requires clear guidelines that are flexible enough to allow for employees to be artists in what they do.
Seth Godin describes this really well in his new book Linchpin (if you haven’t checked it out yet, it is a must read).  His general point is that corporate work trains obedience, being just good enough, and waiting for orders.  To thrive in today’s world we need employees who are artists.  They contribute value, connect to customers in ways that are human, and can make a real impact that propels the company.  These people are linchpins.
Rigid guidelines choke the life out of such employees.  Demanding metrics over artistry mechanizes the processes, makes it sub par, and outsourceable.  It’s why companies like Apple and Google, the leaders in business, thrive and are adored.  Other companies say they want to be like Apple or Google, but this just means they want to be loved while producing mediocre results.
Any social media policy should be a guideline.  Your employees are smart enough to know what they should and shouldn’t do (if not – get new employees).  A good legal department balances the need of the company to have a policy in place they can point to if something goes wrong, with the need for employees to be free enough to create without fear of censorship, backlash, or worse.  It is a risky game, but one with great rewards if done right.

A social media policy is not some revolutionary mysterious thing.  It is a policy.  Likely a policy no one will read anyway.  Where companies experience mastery is when they do things that are risky, things that ordinary policy making would cry “NO! Don’t do that!”

Notice I said risky.  Not stupid.  As a member of the  legal department it is your job to protect the company, but realize that your employees are likely smarter than you think they are.  Also, they are more creative than most of us realize.

If your management creates a linchpin culture where employees take risk, reach for greatness, and share their gifts then your policies at best should be guidelines to help amplify that.  If you have an assembly line amassing Twitter followers than perhaps you want something more rigid that will meet the CYA standard.  All I’m saying is that in a world where everybody is on Facebook, the winners are those who can connect with customers in ways that automation cannot.

1 Comment

Filed under Legal, social media

How to Be a Blogging Superstar

If you are anything like me you tend to want to do a lot.  As someone with lots of energy and drive I find myself jumping from project to project.  This would be fine if I had an unlimited amount of time and resources, didn’t need sleep, and had no other commitments.  Belonging to the human race this just isn’t so.  There is a need to focus, create, and finish.

At present I write on three blogs: Mintz’s Wordz (this one), Lurkers Anonymous (my blog to book project on motivation and engagement), and The Martindale Blog (my work blog).  I fluctuate between levels of commitment on all three and it can be difficult to prioritize and produce.  Often my “lizard brain” the part of me that fears progress and success, hampers my efforts, and tells me what I’m writing is useless, tells me don’t write on any of them.  These are the things I can find myself thinking:

“No one will read it.”

“Seth Godin has said it better already.”

“Waste of time.”

The key to being a blogging superstar is to write in spite of those thoughts. Even if the fear can say “I told you so,” for example, your latest post only got 2 views (one of which was you), just write.  Keep on posting.  Try to be consistent.  Work on crafting, honing, and delivering your message.  What you will get out of it is a satisfaction that you did something.  Sure there are millions of blog posts going up everyday.  Not all of us can be a Chris Brogan, Perez Hilton, or Gary Vaynerchuk (for anyone not geekly inclined – these are some of the most successful bloggers on the Internet today).  But in creating, sharing, giving of yourself to the collective body of the world you move closer towards connecting.  Closer towards making a difference.  Delivering your masterpiece.

Yesterday I crossed the 100 post threshold with this blog.  At my best I had 400 views in one day.  This blog is not a blockbuster (yet).  What it has done is opened doors.  I have met people through the blog, built valuable connections, and created opportunities.  It has given me an outlet to share ideas, develop projects, and lead to other things.   Most of all it exists as a body of work I have done.  That is a take away from this post: publishing your ideas, shipping the product is creation.  This creation exists as something to point to – a road map of what you have done.  Having it and continuing to add to it makes you a blogging superstar.

Taking your blog to another level is something I am learning reading sites like ProBlogger (how to monetize and increase your efforts).  The tactics there are great for accomplishing certain goals with a blog.  But at it’s essence blogging is about creating and sharing.  Continue to do that, on a consistent basis, for the sake of doing what you love and you are a superstar.

Leave a comment

Filed under Commentary and Critiques

Seth Godin’s Linchpin and Mastering the Art of Social Media Policy

Daniel A. Schwartz, author of the Connecticut Employment Law Blog posted about one of the presentations from Legal Tech last week.  His post, Social Media Policies and Practices Developing as Companies Begin to Embrace It, gave some details from the panel discussion by the following in-house lawyers: Lesley Rosenthal (Lincoln Center), Ted Banks (former in-house at Kraft), and Mark Bisard (American Express).  Check out Daniels post here.
The panelists basically discussed how social media policy is becoming a more recognized form of policy for a company to have.  Ted Banks spoke up as say that employees can become disheartened and resentful of too restrictive a policy.  I left this comment in response:
I am most in agreement with Ted about social media presenting an opportunity to companies to engage their creative employees and let them flourish.  This requires clear guidelines that are flexible enough to allow for employees to be artists in what they do.
Seth Godin describes this really well in his new book Linchpin (if you haven’t checked it out yet, it is a must read).  His general point is that corporate work trains obedience, being just good enough, and waiting for orders.  To thrive in today’s world we need employees who are artists.  They contribute value, connect to customers in ways that are human, and can make a real impact that propels the company.  These people are linchpins.
Rigid guidelines choke the life out of such employees.  Demanding metrics over artistry mechanizes the processes, makes it sub par, and outsourceable.  It’s why companies like Apple and Google, the leaders in business, thrive and are adored.  Other companies say they want to be like Apple or Google, but this just means they want to be loved while producing mediocre results.
Any social media policy should be a guideline.  Your employees are smart enough to know what they should and shouldn’t do (if not – get new employees).  A good legal department balances the need of the company to have a policy in place they can point to if something goes wrong, with the need for employees to be free enough to create without fear of censorship, backlash, or worse.  It is a risky game, but one with great rewards if done right.

A social media policy is not some revolutionary mysterious thing.  It is a policy.  Likely a policy no one will read anyway.  Where companies experience mastery is when they do things that are risky, things that ordinary policy making would cry “NO! Don’t do that!”

Notice I said risky.  Not stupid.  As a member of the  legal department it is your job to protect the company, but realize that your employees are likely smarter than you think they are.  Also, they are more creative than most of us realize.

If your management creates a linchpin culture where employees take risk, reach for greatness, and share their gifts then your policies at best should be guidelines to help amplify that.  If you have an assembly line amassing Twitter followers than perhaps you want something more rigid that will meet the CYA standard.  All I’m saying is that in a world where everybody is on Facebook, the winners are those who can connect with customers in ways that automation cannot.

Leave a comment

Filed under Legal, social media